How to Play Jazz Guitar in 14 Days

  • Step-by-step 14 day program of jazz guitar for beginners
  • Chord progressions, arpeggios, scales, octaves, guitar licks
  • Learn how to walk a bass line and comp at the same time!

Do you want to learn to play jazz guitar quickly? Here’s you everything you need to begin playing jazz with another guitarist, singer, or even in a group setting.

 

This jazz guitar book is divided into 14 lessons, one for each day of the two-week program. In each guitar lesson, you’ll learn:

• Chord Progressions
• Arpeggios
• Scales
• Octaves
• Guitar licks

 

Learn how to walk a bass line and comp at the same time!

 

Let’s be honest: learning jazz is intimidating. But, for those who are new to jazz, much of the intimidation comes from not knowing where to begin. With How to Play Jazz Guitar in 14 Days, they goal is to demystify the genre by breaking down the style’s main components—chords, scales, improvisation, song form—into small, easy-to-digest nuggets so guitarists, no matter their musical background, will have a clear understanding of jazz, and how to play it, in just two weeks.

So, whether you’re a guitarist who’s been playing for a few years, or you’ve been playing for decades but are unfamiliar with jazz, this jazz guitar book will get you swingin’ and fast!

  • Learn the most important progressions in jazz
  • Quickly pick up new scales, chords & techniques
  • Solo over major, minor, and dominant 7th chords
  • Download free audio demos for every day so you know what the music figures sound like.

 

 

This is a brand new method for learning jazz guitar. Written by a 30-year guitar veteran who has seen it ALL and knows what works and what doesn’t.

Below are excerpts from several sections of How to Play Jazz Guitar in 14 Days.

INTRODUCTION

Play jazz guitar in 14 days?! That’s impossible! If that was your initial reaction to this book, you’re probably not alone. But the truth is, if you’re truly dedicated to learning jazz guitar, and you’re willing to put in the work, you can learn all the tools you’ll need to be a well-rounded and competent jazz guitarist in just two weeks’ time.

If you’re an absolute beginner looking for a method book to teach you the fundamentals of playing guitar… well, this isn’t it. Instead, How to Play Jazz Guitar in 14 Days is focused on teaching you everything you need to begin playing jazz with another guitarist, singer, or even in a group setting. While the book is not written for beginners, the material, while challenging, shouldn’t be too difficult for intermediate players. So, whether you’re a guitarist who’s been playing for a few years, or you’ve been playing for decades but are unfamiliar with jazz, How to Play Jazz Guitar in 14 Days will get you swingin’…. fast! (section continues in book)

 

Week 1: Jazz Blues Changes

Below is a 12-bar jazz-blues form in the key of G. These changes will be the template for the first week of lessons. Before you begin Day 1’s exercises, however, spend some time getting familiar with this set of chord changes, particularly where the primary chords, I (G7) and IV (C7), fall within the progression.

Once you get through Week 1, you’ll know these changes inside and out!

How to Play Jazz Guitar in 14 Days

Day 1

CHORD CHANGES (1:30–1:15)

This first exercise features a pair of common barre-chord shapes, one whose root is located on string 6 (G7), and one whose root is found on string 5 (C7). If you’re familiar with these shapes, this exercise shouldn’t be too difficult; if they’re new to you, get comfortable with barring your index finger across all six strings at fret 3, keeping the index in place as you switch between the two chords, moving from an index-ring-middle combo (G7) to an index-ring-pinky combo (C7).

Notice the accents (>) on beats 2 and 4 of each measure. These symbols indicated that beats 2 and 4 should be played a little more forcefully (i.e., louder) than beats 1 and 3. Also, in true jazz fashion, play each chord staccato; that is, cut their quarter-note durations short, rather than allowing them to ring out. You can achieve this sound by briefly releasing the finger pressure of your frethand after striking the chord, and returning the fingers for each new chord strum. The result should be a “bouncing” motion in your frethand. Be sure to listen to the accompanying audio to hear how the chords should sound.

Rhythmically, this exercise is identical to the previous one. Harmonically, it’s a little different because the 7th chords are replaced by “jazzy” extended chords, G13 and C9. These extended chords function in the same way as the 7th chords (i.e., as dominant chords), only their tonalities are a little more robust, or “sophisticated.”