Master Pentatonic Scales For Guitar in 14 Days

  • The foundation of all great guitar playing!
  • Five box patterns & two extended patterns
  • Easy-to-follow guitar tab and explanations

Learning to play the guitar? Then you need this book! Pentatonic scales are the basis for almost anything you’ll ever want to learn and master on the guitar. Take the time to learn the pentatonic scales. They will be the foundation for all of the great playing you dream of doing. 

 

Master Pentatonic Scales for Guitar in 14 Days will teach you the five (5) box patterns and two (2) extended patterns of the major and minor pentatonic scales, as well as their relative blues scales.

 

Learn exercises that will enable you to play the scales more “musically,” how to connect the patterns across the entire fretboard, and how the patterns can be used to create licks for soloing, and much more!

Inside this book you will find guitar lessons packed with guitar tab and explanations for:

•Scale Patterns

•Exercises

•Arpeggios

•Techniques

•Lead Licks

•Major and Minor Blues Scales

•Connecting the Patterns

All guitar examples are demonstrated in clear, expertly formatted tab and include an audio demonstration track so you never have to go it alone.

FREE access to instant audio downloads from Troy’s website included

Below are excerpts from several sections of Master Pentatonic Scales for Guitar in 14 Days!

INTRODUCTION

Whether it’s rock, blues, country, or pop, no scales get more fretboard time than major and minor pentatonic. One reason is their two-notes-per-string patterns, which are relatively easy to play and memorize–certainly easier than their seven-note counterparts, the major and minor scale. Another reason is that they just sound so good! For proof, take a listen to players like Stevie Ray Vaughan, Albert King, or Joe Bonamassa squeeze pure emotion out of every note of the minor pentatonic scale over a slow blues. Likewise, country guitarists such as Brad Paisley, Vince Gill, and Brent Mason have for decades burned up their fretboards with notes from the major pentatonic scale.

The goal of Master Pentatonic Scales For Guitar in 14 Days is to teach you the five box patterns and two extended patterns of the major and minor pentatonic scales, as well as their companions, the major and minor blues scales. In addition to mastering the patterns themselves, you’ll also learn exercises that will enable you to play the scales musically (and less like a practice session), how to connect the patterns in order to play the scales across the entire fretboard, how the patterns can be used to create licks for soloing, and much more. While the book might be a bit too advanced for absolute beginners, guitarists at the “late beginner” or “early intermediate” stage in their development should find the material more than manageable…  (section continues in book)

 

THEORY BEHIND PENTATONIC SCALES 

THE MAJOR SCALE

Any lesson on music theory must begin with the major scale. The major scale is a seven-note scale constructed from a specific pattern of half steps (distance of one fret on guitar) and whole steps (two frets): whole–whole–half–whole–whole–whole–half (W–W–H–W–W–W–H). In the key of C, the major scale is spelled: C–D–E–F–G–A–B (1–2–3–4–5–6–7). To best demonstrate the whole step/half step formula, here’s the C major scale laid across the fifth string:

Master Pentatonic Scales for Guitar in 14 Days

In the musical alphabet, A–B–C–D–E–F–G, a half step naturally occurs between the notes B and C and the notes E and F. In the case of the C major scale, which contains no sharps or flats, these natural half steps occur between the third and four and seventh and eighth degrees of the scale (the eighth degree is the same as the first degree, just an octave higher). Here’s the C major scale played across the strings in fourth/fifth position with the half steps clearly illustrated:

Master Pentatonic Scales for Guitar in 14 Days

You can apply this intervallic formula, W–W–H–W–W–W–H, to any of the 12 notes of the chromatic scale to get its corresponding major scale. (section continues in book)

 

 

DAY 1

SCALE: C MAJOR PENTATONIC – PATTERN 1 (1:30–1:15)

Below is Pattern 1 of the C major pentatonic scale (C–D–E–G–A)—the same pattern that was featured in the book’s introduction—presented both in tab and in a scale diagram. Suggested frethand fingerings for this two-octave scale are displayed below the tab staff, and root notes are illustrated as white dots in the scale diagram. As you practice the scale, be sure to mentally note where the roots appear because this will be very beneficial when you start to solo with this scale, as well as when you start to transpose the scale to other keys.   

Of the five “box” patterns, Pattern 1 is by far the most popular among guitarists, for a couple of reasons: 1) it’s easy to learn and remember, and 2) it’s great for performing string bends due to the way the notes naturally fall within the scale (which you’ll discover as we move on to other patterns). Set your metronome (or drum loop) to a slow tempo—say, 40 or 50 beats per minute (BPM)—and practice the scale at that tempo until you can play it cleanly. Then increase your tempo by a few BPM and do the same, continuing to do so until the 15 minutes are up.

Master Pentatonic Scales for Guitar in 14 Days

Master Pentatonic Scales for Guitar in 14 Days